EXPO CRUISES AND TOURS
Duration: January 20, 2019 - February 14, 2019

NEW ZEALAND & PAPUA NEW GUINEA

25-Day cruise aboard SEA PRINCESS
January 20 – February 14, 2019

Escape to this unhurried corner of the world, where Māori legends, steaming volcanic lakes, penguins and hobbits add to the magical landscape. From the historic North Island, known as “the birthplace of the nation,” to the stirring drama of Fiordland National Park, a cruise to New Zealand with Princess will defy expectations.  Papua New Guinea, in the southwestern Pacific, encompasses the eastern half of New Guinea and its offshore islands. A country of immense cultural and biological diversity, it’s known for its beaches and coral reefs. Inland are active volcanoes, granite Mt. Wilhelm, dense rainforest, and hiking routes. There are also traditional tribal villages, many with their own languages.


Brisbane, AUSTRALIA                         Embark            4 pm
Cruise Coral Sea                                  ~                      ~
Cruise Tasman Sea                              ~                      ~
Cruise Tasman Sea                              ~                      ~
Cruising Fiorland National Park          7 am                4 pm
Dunedin, NEW ZEALAND                   8 am                6 pm
Akaroa, NEW ZEALAND                     8 am                6 pm
Wellington, NEW ZEALAND               8 am                6 pm
Napier, NEW ZEALAND                      7 am                4 pm
Tauranga, NEW ZEALAND                 9 am                9 pm
Auckland, NEW ZEALAND                  8 am                6 pm
Cruise Tasman Sea                              ~                      ~
Cruise Coral Sea                                  ~                      ~
Brisbane, AUSTRALIA                         8 am                4 pm
Cruise Coral Sea                                  ~                      ~
Cruise Coral Sea                                  ~                      ~
Alotau, PAPUA NEW GUINEA             8 am                7 pm
Kitava, PAPUA NEW GUINEA            7 am                4 pm
Rabaul, PAPUA NEW GUINEA           9 am                5 pm
Kiriwina, PAPUA NEW GUINEA         9 am                6 pm
Conflict Is. PAPUA NEW GUINEA       7 am                6 pm
Kawanasausau Strait & Milne Bay     am                   am
Cruise Coral Sea                                  ~                      ~
Cruise Coral Sea                                  ~                      ~
Brisbane, AUSTRALIA                         Disembark
Depart for CANADA

Book Now & Receive $200 US Onboard Credit Per Cabin

DOUBLE OCCUPANCY FARES:
INSIDE Cat. ID              $4,795              INSIDE Cat. IC              $4,850                           INSIDE Cat. IB              $4,950
OUTSDE Cat. OW*       $5,395              OUTSIDE Cat. OF         $5,995                          OUTSIDE Cat. OC            $6,095
BALCONY Cat. BD       $6,895              BALCONY Cat. BC       $6,995                          BALCONY Cat. BB            $7,195
MINI SUITES – Upon Request              *Please note category OW has obstructed view.

SINGLE OCCUPANCY FARES:
INSIDE Cat. ID              $8,495              OUTSIDE Cat. OW*      $9,795                          BALCONY Cat. BD – $12,595

Initial deposit of $1,750 per person is required.  Final Payment is due by OCTOBER 23, 2018

ALL PRICES ARE IN CANADIAN DOLLARS PER PERSON AND INCLUDE:
26-Day cruise with all your meals and entertainment (shore excursions are not included).
All your port taxes and government fees.
All your prepaid shipboard gratuities during your cruise.
Please Note: Cost of the airfare from select cities will be quoted at time of booking
when available with Princess Cruises as well as any optional hotel stays with your cruise.
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BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA – Once considered the “country cousin” among Australian cities, Brisbane is today the nation’s third-largest metropolis – and one of the most desirable places to live in the country.  Lying on the banks of the meandering Brisbane River, this cosmopolitan city boasts elegant 19th-century sandstone buildings, a lively cultural scene, and superb parklands. Brisbane is also your gateway to uniquely Australian adventures, be it the theme parks of the Gold Coast or Queensland’s dazzling beaches.  The beaches south of Brisbane form Queensland’s Gold Coast.  Travel tip: Brisbane is pronounced “Bris-bin.

FIORDLAND NATIONAL PARK, NEW ZEALAND New Zealand’s largest national park was formed millennia ago by massive glacial flows that carved deep fiords into the coast of New Zealand’s South Island.  At the heart of Fiordland National Park lies Milford Sound.  Lined by cliffs that soar nearly a mile above its surface, Milford Sound cuts into the heart of the Southern Alps.  Rainforest clings to the cliffs and graceful waterfalls plummet into the void.  Mile-high Mitre Peak dominates the upper reaches of the sound.  The town of Te Anau in Fiordland National Park is also your gateway to the South Island’s other natural wonders including Lake Wakatipu, the resort of Queenstown and Mt. Cook National Park.

DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND – Perched on the hills above one of New Zealand’s loveliest harbors, Dunedin is a Kiwi city with a Scottish heart. Hailed as the “Edinburgh of New Zealand,” Dunedin is proud of its heritage.  A statue of famed Scottish poet Robert Burns graces downtown, and the presence of New Zealand’s only kilt maker and whisky distillery – as well as many bagpipe bands – keep Dunedin’s ties to Scotland alive.  The city also boasts a distinguished architectural and cultural history, a legacy of New Zealand’s 1860s gold rush.  Port Chalmers, gateway to Dunedin, is located eight miles from the city center. Dunedin is a planned city: its streets and suburbs fan out from the city’s octagon.

AKAROA, NEW ZEALAND – On the eastern shores of New Zealand’s South Island, Akaroa is a popular tourist destination with a distinctly French flair, its history steeped in legend.  It lies on the volcanic Banks Peninsula, which the Maori believe was formed when a hero named Maui piled mountains upon a giant who threatened to eat his children.  The same peninsula was purchased from the local Maori by a French whaler around 1838, and was later settled by both the French and the British, who had just signed the Treaty of Waitangi ensuring New Zealand’s existence as a British colony.   With French-named streets leading to restaurants serving French cuisine and colonial architecture all around, Akaroa’s heritage as the only French-founded community in New Zealand is unmistakable.  Akaroa harbour is home to a diverse array of marine life, including rare Hector’s dolphins, and visitors are lured by the area’s secluded beaches and quaint boutiques.

WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND – New Zealand’s capital offers stunning views of forested peninsulas, dramatic cliff-side homes, and fine Victorian buildings.  Settled in 1840 by the London-based New Zealand Company, “wonderful, windy Wellington” is frequently buffeted by bracing winds funnelling through Cook Strait.  The sophisticated metropolis boasts museums, winding streets and even a cable car.  No wonder many travelers compare it to San Francisco.  Despite its steep hills, the city can be easily explored on foot.  Kelburn Cable Car, stairways and footpaths climb the slopes from the city center.

NAPIER, NEW ZEALAND – Napier and Hawke’s Bay have become New Zealand’s premier lifestyle getaways.  Located on the North Island’s eastern coast, New Zealand’s oldest wine-growing region boasts a superb Mediterranean climate and golden sand beaches. In recent years, Hawke’s Bay has become a leading producer of fine olive oils and artisanal cheeses.  Wildlife lovers and birders will flock to Cape Kidnappers in Southern Hawke Bay: The Cape is home to the largest mainland gannet colony in the world.  In 1931, a 7.8 magnitude earthquake leveled Napier.  The town rebuilt itself, and today Napier is hailed as the “Art Deco City” for its superb collection of Deco, Spanish Mission, and Classical Revival buildings.

TAURANGA, NEW ZEALAND – New Zealand’s natural bounty is always on display at the Bay of Plenty.  It was Captain James Cook who in 1769 aptly named this bay, thanks to the prosperous Maori villages of the region. Tauranga, the chief city, is a bustling port, an agricultural and timber center, and a popular seaside resort. Tauranga is also the gateway to Rotorua – a geothermal wonderland that is the heart of Maori culture. A 90-minute drive from Tauranga, Rotorua is New Zealand’s primary tourist attraction.  Your ship docks near the foot of Mt. Maunganui, which rises 761 feet above the bay.  Across the harbor, Tauranga offers scenic tidal beaches at Omokoroa and Pahoia.  The region boasts fine beaches, big-game fishing, thermal springs, and seaside resorts. 

AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – Straddling a narrow isthmus created by 60 different volcanoes, New Zealand’s former capital boasts scenic beauty, historical interest and a cosmopolitan collection of shops, restaurants, museums, galleries, and gardens.  Rangitoto, Auckland’s largest and youngest volcano, sits in majestic splendor just offshore. Mt. Eden and One Tree Hill, once home to Maori earthworks, overlook the city.  One of New Zealand’s fine wine districts lies to the north of Auckland.  Auckland served as New Zealand’s capital from 1841 until 1865, when the seat of government moved to Wellington.

ALOTAU, PAPUA NEW GUINEA – Welcome to an undiscovered paradise of white-sand beaches, crystal waterfalls and volcanic mountains.  And if you’ve come for history, you’ll find that, too.  This peaceful town was the site of fierce fighting during World War II. Today, it’s a peaceful retreat offering the vacationer plenty of time to relax and connect with nature.  Beyond the city you’ll find a tropical rainforest full of birds of paradise and a laid-back ease worth discovering.

RABAUL, PAPUA NEW GUINEA – The former capital of New Britain has a history of destruction and resurrection – the city rebuilt after a massive 1937 volcanic eruption only to be destroyed by Allied bombing in World War II.  In 1994, the eruption of Mt. Tavurvur dropped hot ash and rock on Rabaul, leading to its partial abandonment.  Since that cataclysm, the city has slowly returned to life – hotels have resumed operating, the market continues to trade, and the harbor remains one of the most impressive in the entire Pacific basin.   During World War II, Rabaul served as a forward operating base for the Imperial Japanese Army and Navy. Allied bombing forced the Japanese defenders underground, into a complex system of bunkers and tunnels on the Gazelle.